The Cover

I’m thrilled to announce that the cover for Embers at Dawn has gotten a positive mention in The Book Designer’s monthly e-book Cover Design Award. I quote: “Very atmospheric cover that I’m sure will have the desired effect.” This is what I wrote about the cover: “I designed the cover myself. I’m a professional photographer, so it was an easy choice to take that particular job myself. The book is the first in a series. The series’ caption at the bottom is meant to be reused on the upcoming books. It’s a western novel. The face on the cover is the protagonist.”

Evolution of a cover: From rough sketch – via mock-ups – to finished result.

Designing the cover for my debut novel has been a meandering journey in sketches and mock-ups. I’ve been working on the concept for the cover art for almost as long as it has taken me to complete the writing (I have a lot more sketches and mock-ups than the ones shown here). I knew early on that I wanted Lee’s face on the cover, featuring her whiskers and ever present cigarette. I dabbled with the idea of hiring someone to draw the cover, but I eventually decided that I wanted a photograph on the cover and to do the job myself.

Because Embers at Dawn is the first in a series, I wanted a style that could be easily copied onto the upcoming books. The idea is to have a different close-up image of Lee’s face on the cover of each book. Ingvild Eiring has kindly agreed to pose as Lee throughout the entire series. I’m aware of the fact that the title Embers at Dawn is somewhat cryptic, so it was important to have the series’ title in focus too. The “label” (at the bottom of the cover) will be reused on future releases in the series.

To emphasize the western genre I used fonts I bought from Walden Font Co. It’s the first time I’ve paid for fonts, but I’m very glad that I did. I made several mock-ups of the cover using whatever fonts I had at hand, but they didn’t quite “fit” the gritty western style I was looking for. Walden Font Co. have also been kind enough to feature the cover art for Embers at Dawn in their customer gallery. Thanks guys!

If you’d like to wear the gorgeous Ingvild/Lee, I’ve made a T-Shirt featuring the cover photo that can be bought here: Cafepress

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Yee-haw, an Indie’s Life for Me

When I started writing my debut novel Embers at Dawn, I simultaneously started exploring the possibilities with self-publishing and found “the deal” enthusing. One deciding factor to not pursue the traditional route of publishing houses was royalties. The idea of getting paid more per book sold (at a lower price), than if I’d been signed to a publishing house sounded like a good idea… Or a very fair lottery ticket. The other deciding factor was control.

I relied heavily on my experiences as a freelance photographer when I made the decision to try my luck with self-publishing. I kept coming back to a want and a need to be in complete control of my first book project. I was tired of my success being at the mercy of others, being given half creative freedom on jobs I did for free and… I’ll stop right there, before I go into an angry rant, but I’ll tell you this much: It’s a whole lot easier to sell a finished product, such as a book, than to boast that something can be done.

Self-published books have started to find their way into the regular charts and bookstores. Self-published authors are being headhunted by agents and publishing houses. This is another reason why I figured self-publishing might not be such a bad idea. I get to publish my book my way, but still don’t opt out of the world of “regular” publishing if I should change my mind.

Choosing to self publish was also an easy choice to make because it has become easy to do, relatively speaking at least. Yes, I have to do pretty much everything myself, but there’s a plethora of guides and forums with all the information one could need. And as you have probably picked up on by now, doing everything myself is just the way I like it. I still have to market my work, but I don’t have to buddy up with the local fashion mafia, hoping to get an editorial in the next issue of [insert name of generic fashion magazine] that would give me half a toe inside whatever door is the trend that season.

I haven’t entirely given up on photography, my previous post should state that fact quite clearly, but I no longer pursue a career as a photographer. I started losing the joy in doing it and decided that I’d rather flip the industry a big, fat bird and enjoy photography with personal projects instead.

The irony in this is that what’s going on in the world of publishing looks a lot like what the world of photography has been through. The digital revolution made “everyone” a photographer and ultimately rendered my hard-earned craft’s certificate redundant, and my endless hours spent in the darkroom a quaint skill. Now, indie publishing has made “everyone” an author too, but what I experienced as a negative effect in the world of photography feels more like a positive revolution in publishing.

Cowgirl Photo Project

This is a project I’m super excited to tell y’all about: It’s a photo collaboration with model and costume designer Ingvild Eiring. We have already completed two sessions on different locations and plan to do at least three or four more. We might be done by the end of the year. The project will definitely culminate in a book and hopefully an exhibition.

The theme is vaguely based on the Old West, with a somewhat fleeting cowgirl character in the “lead role.” We’re more concerned about creating something captivating, than to stay true to historical accuracy or a tangible storyline. Sources of inspiration range from Helmut Newton to Matthew Brady. The series will be shot entirely on Polaroid.